If you are new to MVC and want to learn important points of MVC, to create a new application, then you have landed on the right place. I have already written a basic tutorial of C# MVC, I assume you have read it, if not please go through it quickly, to understand basics of MVC, it should not take more than 5-10 minutes.

Understanding the MVC Pattern

In high-level terms, the MVC pattern means that an MVC application will be split into at least three pieces:

  • Models, which contain or represent the data that users work with. These can be simple view models, which just represent data being transferred between views and controllers; or they can be domain models, which contain the data in a business domain as well as the operations, transformations, and rules for manipulating that data.
  • Views, which are used to render some part of the model as a user interface.
  • Controllers, which process incoming requests, perform operations on the model, and select views to render to the user.

The ASP.NET Implementation of MVC

In MVC, controllers are C# classes, usually derived from the System.Web.Mvc.Controller class. Each public method in a class derived from Controller is an action method, which is associated with a configurable URL through the ASP.NET routing system. When a request is sent to the URL associated with an action method, the statements in the controller class are executed in order to perform some operation on the domain model and then select a view to display to the client. Figure 3-1 shows the interactions between the controller, model, and view.

MVC-Pattern

The interactions in an MVC application

The ASP.NET MVC Framework uses a view engine, which is the component responsible for processing a view in order to generate a response for the browser. Earlier versions of MVC used the standard ASP.NET view engine, which processed ASPX pages using a streamlined version of the Web Forms markup syntax. MVC 3 introduced the Razor view engine, which was refined in MVC 4 (and unchanged in MVC5) and that uses a different syntax entirely.

Understanding Classic Three-Tier Architectures

To address the problems of the model-view architecture, the three-tier or three-layer pattern separates the persistence code from the domain model and places it in a new component called the ddata access layer (DAL)

Three-Tier-MVC-arch.jpg

The three-tier architecture is the most widely used pattern for business applications. It has no constraints on how the UI is implemented and provides good separation of concerns without being too complicated. And, with some care, the DAL can be created so that unit testing is relatively easy. You can see the obvious similarities between a classic three-tier application and the MVC pattern. The difference is that when the UI layer is directly coupled to a click-and-event GUI framework (such as Windows Forms or ASP.NET Web Forms), it becomes almost impossible to perform automated unit tests. And because the UI part of a three-tier application can be complex, there’s a lot of code that can’t be rigorously tested.

Now please read this tutorial if you haven't done it till now, to understand implmentation of basic MVC pattern in .NET.

Connecting to database 

Here I am making use of Microsoft’s Northwind Database.

Now I will explain the steps to configure and add Entity Framework and also how to connect it with the database.
You will need to add Entity Data Model to your project by right clicking the Solution Explorer and then click on Add and then New Item option of the Context Menu.
 
From the Add New Item window, select ADO.NET Entity Data Model and set its Name as NorthwindModel and then click Add.
 
ADO-NET-EF.jpg
Then the Entity Data Model Wizard will open up where you need to select EF Designer database option.

DOT-NET-New-Tut-DBCOnnect.png

Now the wizard will ask you to connect and configure the Connection String to the database, click on "New Connection" button on top right side, select
1.     SQL Server Instance
2.     Database
And then click Test Connection to make sure all settings are correct.
 
newConntion-EF-ADO-NET.jpg
 
Click "Ok", then select "Yes, include sensitive data in the connection string", Click"Next", now slect specific table or all tables
 
Table-Selection-ADO-NET.png
 
Click "Finish" and your .edmx file is created , and your project is now connected with database.
 
Note:
To see your tables and it''s column, expand Edmx_name.edmx , then expand Edmx_name.tt file , check your database table and it's coumn
Edmx-Structure-ASP-Tutorial.png

Controller

The Entity Framework is now configured and hence now we can create a Controller and write code to fetch the records from the Customers Table of the Northwind Database.
Inside the Index Action method, the Top 10 Customer records are fetched and returned to the View.

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    // GET: Home
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        NorthwindEntities entities = new NorthwindEntities();
        return View(from customer in entities.Customers.Take(10)
                    select customer);
    }
}

View
Now you will need to Right Click inside the Controller class and click on the Add View option in order to create a View for the Controller.
The Name of the View is set to Index, the Template option is set to Empty, the Model class is set to Customer Entity (the one we have generated using Entity Framework) and finally the Data context class is set to NorthwindEntities.
 
Inside the View, in the very first line the Customer Entity is declared as IEnumerable which specifies that it will be available as a Collection.
For displaying the records, an HTML Table is used. A loop will be executed over the Model which will generate the HTML Table rows with the Customer records.
 
@model IEnumerable<Entity_Framework_MVC.Customer>
 
@{
    Layout = null;
}
 
<!DOCTYPE html>
 
<html>
<head>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width"/>
    <title>Index</title>
</head>
<body>
    <h4>Customers</h4>
    <hr/>
    <table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
        <tr>
            <th>CustomerId</th>
            <th>ContactName</th>
            <th>City</th>          
        </tr>
        // Foreach loop through each customer and print's customer properties
        @foreach (Customer customer in Model)
        {
            <tr>
                <td>@customer.CustomerID</td>
                <td>@customer.ContactName</td>
                <td>@customer.City</td>
             
            </tr>
        }
    </table>
</body>
</html>

Output :-

Output-ASP-NET-Snip.png

Inserting Data in database

Create a ActionMethod in controller and it's view name it as "AddCustomer"

      public ActionResult AddCustomer()
        {
            return View();
        }

Right click inside action method and click 'Add View', now in this view we will write code to save new customer, i will explain code line with comments

<!--Describes the model of this view-->
@model Test.Models.Customer

<!--@ charatcer represents the razor code, here we have written title tag value--> 
@{
    ViewBag.Title = "AddCustomer";
}

<h2>Add Customer</h2>

<!--this is start of Form in razor syntax, "NewCustomer" is action , "Home" is controller and form type is "POST"--> 
@using (Html.BeginForm("NewCustomer", "Home", FormMethod.Post))
{

<!--This is for security purpose, use to protect application against cross-site request forgery-->   
@Html.AntiForgeryToken()

<div class="form-group">
   <div class="row">
    <div class="col-lg-2">
        Customer Name
    </div>
    <div class="col-lg-10">}
<!--here we can write normal html or use razor html helpers, this is razor syntax to create textbox with name and id as Customername-->  
        @Html.TextBoxFor(a=>a.Customername, new {@class="form-control" })
    </div>
</div>
</div>
<div class="form-group">
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-lg-2">
           Contact title
        </div>
        <div class="col-lg-10">
            @Html.TextBoxFor(a => a.ContactTitle, new { @class = "form-control" })
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
<div class="form-group">
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-lg-2">
            Contact name
        </div>
        <div class="col-lg-10">
            @Html.TextBoxFor(a => a.ContactName, new { @class = "form-control" })
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
<div class="form-group">
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-lg-2">
            Address
        </div>
        <div class="col-lg-10">
            @Html.TextBoxFor(a => a.Address, new { @class = "form-control" })
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
<div class="form-group">
    <div class="row">
        <div class="col-lg-2">
           City
        </div>
        <div class="col-lg-10">
            @Html.TextBoxFor(a => a.City, new { @class = "form-control" })
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

<!--Button to submit form values-->
    <input type="submit" class="btn btn-primary" value="Save" />
}

 

Example-ADO-NET-EF.png

Now we need to create a Post method to save values of customer

        [HttpPost] //method type
        [ValidateAntiForgeryToken] //validate antiforgery token 
        public ActionResult NewCustomer(Customer Cs) //get customer Model values in actionmethod
        {
          //Initialize the database connection
            using (var context = new NorthWindEntities())
            {
                //Add customer values in database
                context.Customers.Add(Cs);
               //save the values in database
                context.SaveChanges();

            }
 //Redirect to ActionMethod 'Index' in same controller
           return RedirectToAction("Index");
        }

Check Database for values:-

Databse-ADO-NEt_Example-test.png

That's it we are done.
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